Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Your Cart   |   Sign In   |   Join or Renew
Search FTRF
Roll of Honor
Robert P. Doyle2009 recipient - Executive Director, Illinois Library Assn
Frank Zappa1994 recipient (deceased) - musician, composer, artist, iconoclast, free expression hero

The FTRF Blog
Blog Home All Blogs
Read the latest news about FTRF and the First Amendment in Libraries and engage with thoughtful opinions from leaders in our community on The FTRF Blog. If you are interested in writing for the blog, please email Jonathan Kelley at jokelley@ala.org.

 

Search all posts for:   

 

Top tags: Banned Books Week  Judith Krug Memorial Fund  BBW2014  membership  banned books  Carolyn Forsman  Roll of Honor  Board of Trustees  election  FTRF News  grants  Judith Krug remembrances  Midwinter Meeting  Annual Conference  Banned Websites Awareness Day  Conable Scholarship  filtering  litigation  Media Coalition  Russell Shank  Sara Paretsky  special events  Theresa Chmara  Tucson  Utah  2013  AASL  ALA  Barbara Jones  BWAD 

Captain Underpants is 2013's most frequently challenged book, per ALA

Posted By Jonathan Kelley, Monday, April 14, 2014
As part of its annual "State of America's Libraries" report, the American Library Association today released the list of the top ten most frequently challenged books of 2013. Leading the list for the second year in a row is Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants series. Second was Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, Sherman Alexie's Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, E.L. James' Fifty Shades of Grey, and Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games.

You can read the full Top 10 list, and compare it with prior years' lists, at http://www.ala.org/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10

Tags:  Banned Books Week  Captain Underpants  Top Ten list 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Remembering Judith, Part 5: 2009 Memorials

Posted By Jonathan Kelley, Friday, April 11, 2014
Five years ago today, Judith Krug passed away. To honor her memory, we are posting a series of remembrances on the Freedom to Read Foundation blog throughout the day. If you would like to add a memory, please feel free to email ftrf@ala.org or post a note in the comments.

For our final post today, here are some memorials of Judith from 2009 -

ALA's "Remembering Judith" page still contains numerous testimonials and links to articles and some of Judith's media appearances.

Judith's family suggested posting this obituary from NPR, which includes Judith talking about her work.

And finally, here's the tribute video created by American Libraries Magazine for -- and shown at -- the Freedom to Read Foundation's 40th Anniversary Gala:




If you would like to support Judith's legacy, please consider making a contribution to FTRF's Judith F. Krug Memorial Fund. Your donations to the Krug Fund will go directly to providing grants to libraries and other organizations celebrating Banned Books Week, and to FTRF's ongoing online intellectual freedom education efforts.  For more information, visit http://www.ftrf.org/?Krug_Fund.

Tags:  Judith Krug remembrances 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Remembering Judith, Part 4: Eva Poole, Mary Minow, Mary Curtis

Posted By Jonathan Kelley, Friday, April 11, 2014
Five years ago today, Judith Krug passed away. To honor her memory, we are posting a series of remembrances on the Freedom to Read Foundation blog throughout the day. If you would like to add a memory, please feel free to email ftrf@ala.org or post a note in the comments.

Here are some additional remembrances we've received:

Eva Poole, Director, Virginia Beach Public Library, FTRF Trustee: I had just become director of the Denton (TX) Public Library in May, 1993 and was attending my first annual conference of the American Library Association the following month.  I arrived at the conference city airport, retrieved my luggage and while waiting in line for a taxi to my hotel, the lady behind me asked if I wanted to share the next cab with her.  I agreed to do so and while on the way to the hotel, we talked. The woman must have sensed my dismay about being away from three-year old daughter for several days.  The woman explained that she too had a daughter and that in spite of her constant travel, her daughter had grown up to be a very independent and confident young woman.  This person, whom I had just met, talked to me like my mother and really calmed my fears about “not being there” for my daughter.  She explained to me how my being a good role model for my daughter was even more important.  When we arrived at the hotel, she paid the cab fare and when she opened the cab door, I said, “Wait, I didn’t get your name”.  The woman turned to me and said, “My name is Judith Krug”.

Mary Minow, LibraryLaw.com, FTRF Trustee: I remember Judith's handwritten thank you notes. Whenever I found something useful, I’d pass it along to her and it meant a lot to me, especially when I was on the newer side, to get a beautiful handwritten note of appreciation directly from Judith. It made me feel special and inspired me to work harder.

Mary E. Curtis, President, Transaction Publishers: I first met Judith Krug in the 1980s, when I became a member of the Association of American Publishers’ Freedom to Read Committee. At the time, the ALA parallel organization was called the Office for Intellectual Freedom. (I always thought the names should have been reversed, and told Judy that…) What a dynamo she was, and what a positive force! Erwin Glikes of Basic Books was the chairman of the committee, and he and Judy worked together so well. The basic issues were much as they are now; someone always wants to suppress ideas they don’t like. What’s new and different is the opportunities to do mischief with technology. I often wish Judy was with us, if only to hear her cutting through to the core concerns, as she always did. She made such a difference.

Tags:  Judith Krug remembrances 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Remembering Judith, Part 3: Chris Finan

Posted By Jonathan Kelley, Friday, April 11, 2014
Five years ago today, Judith Krug passed away. To honor her memory, we are posting a series of remembrances on the Freedom to Read Foundation blog throughout the day. If you would like to add a memory, please feel free to email ftrf@ala.org or post a note in the comments.

Our third remembrance comes from Chris Finan, President, American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression:

I met Judith Krug in 1982 when I started working for Media Coalition, one of the many anti-censorship organizations that she helped to create.  I was in graduate school at the time and didn't have much background in free speech issues.  I had no experience in advocacy.  It didn't seem to matter at first because things seemed pretty quiet.  But the election of Ronald Reagan changed that in a hurry.  Advocates of censorship felt a new sense of empowerment.  On the left, Catharine McKinnon and Andrea Dworkin introduced legislation to suppress works with sexual content that they believed violated the civil rights of women.  On the right, the Rev. Donald Wildmon threatened boycotts against “anti-Christian” TV shows and retailers of men’s magazines.  The Attorney General’s Commission on Pornography urged state legislatures to toughen obscenity laws and encouraged citizens to protest the sale of constitutionally protected material.

It was a frightening time, but Judy never displayed the slightest nervousness.  I remember her testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee on a so-called “child pornography” bill that was so broadly written that it would have suppressed some of the outstanding pieces of classical and modern art.  Senator Strom Thurmond of South Carolina was the chair at the time.  He glowered at Judy and the other witnesses for our side and tried to throw them off by asking them to state whether they supported the laws banning the sale of obscenity.  Judy didn't fall into the trap but bore in on the weaknesses of the bill.  I was so proud of her that day.

Judy was also indefatigable.  She was always on the move.  We used to joke that a grateful United Airlines rolled the planes right up to her door.  Once I called her “Old Iron Pants.”  She didn't slug me.

Tags:  Judith Krug remembrances 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Remembering Judith, Part 2: Judith Platt

Posted By Jonathan Kelley, Friday, April 11, 2014
Five years ago today, Judith Krug passed away. To honor her memory, we are posting a series of remembrances on the Freedom to Read Foundation blog throughout the day.  If you would like to add a memory, please feel free to email ftrf@ala.org or post a note in the comments.

Our second remembrance comes from Judith Platt, Director of Free Expression Advocacy, Association of American Publishers:

Little did I realize when I first came to the Association of American Publishers in 1979 that Judith, who was already a legend, would become my colleague and friend and that the collaboration, trust and love that developed between us over the course of more than a quarter century would head the list of personal and professional joys of my working life.

Judith and I got to see a great deal of each other in the ensuing years.  If  possible, she never missed a meeting  of my Freedom to Read Committee in New York  and I tried to be at as many meetings of the ALA Intellectual Freedom Committee as I could manage, and at  Freedom to Read Foundation Board meetings after I became a trustee.  We were bound by a shared belief in the importance of keeping open lines of communication between the publishing and library communities and in the certainty that a strong alliance of publishers and librarians was essential to the fight for intellectual freedom.  And, wherever we found ourselves, at ALA Annual Conference, at Midwinter, at AAP Annual Meetings, we always set aside one evening just for us, for the comfort of dinner with an old friend. 

Judith was remarkable.  I believe she would have changed the world no matter where or when she had lived.  She would have been equally at home as a facilitator of the Underground Railroad, or a Suffragist fighting for women’s rights, or a member of the French Resistance.  It was our great good fortune that she was of our time and place and that her passion and intelligence were put to work in defending our right to read and speak and think freely.

It’s hard to believe that five years have passed since Judith’s death.  Often, when the phone rings in my office I expect to hear her on the other end, talking me into taking on some new challenge and making me believe it had been my idea all along.  If we have been diminished by Judith’s death, we have been immeasurably enriched by her legacy and the  best way to honor that legacy is to continue the good fight.

Tags:  Judith Krug remembrances 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 
Page 1 of 18
1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6  >   >>   >| 
Member Sign In


Forgot your password?

Join or Renew

News from FTRF
Calendar

4/29/2014
Understanding FTRF's Litigation Efforts: featuring Theresa Chmara



FTRF on Twitter

 


FTRF on Flickr

See more from FTRF on Flickr