ftrf courts, amicus, litigation, briefs
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Robert P. Doyle2009 recipient - Executive Director, Illinois Library Assn
Frank Zappa1994 recipient (deceased) - musician, composer, artist, iconoclast, free expression hero

Litigation & the Courts
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The American judicial system is a vital component of our government, and has proven to be one of the most important institutions in protecting the freedom to read in this country.  From our beginning in 1969, the Freedom to Read Foundation has worked to make sure the interests of libraries, librarians, and library goers have been represented in the courts.  Beyond that, FTRF defends the interests of the press, book stores, authors, artists, and the public to speak and have access to information.

The Freedom to Read Foundation participates in litigation either as a party or by submitting amicus curiae briefs.  Additionally, the General Counsel of the Freedom to Read Foundation has provided legal memoranda on issues of interest to the library world and legal advice to those working to protect and defend First Amendment rights.

In determining whether to participate in litigation, the FTRF Board of Trustees considers several factors, including the facts of the case, the importance of the legal doctrines with respect to the freedom to read, the significance of an adverse result in the case, the impact of FTRF's participation, and (when joining with another organization) the contents and quality of the joint brief.

FTRF works frequently with other organizations, in particular the Media Coalition, in much of its litigation.

For more information on FTRF's litigation efforts:

Current FTRF Cases

Past FTRF Cases

Legal Assistance Grants

Glossary of Legal Terms

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4/29/2014
Understanding FTRF's Litigation Efforts: featuring Theresa Chmara



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